Latest topics
FC Dallas 06B Red looking to add a couple more playersToday at 07:00 pmdja1973
TOURNAMENT: U90C LABOR DAY OPEN Aug 30th-Sept 2nd, 2019Today at 05:51 pmTD@U90C
guest player for Labor Day tournamentToday at 04:16 pmitsjustagame
Looks like the cost of playing in DPL this year just went upToday at 02:13 pmBENDMEOVER
Does BigE still cross dress?Today at 01:28 pmFoxysoccermom
DA and ECNL questionToday at 01:21 pmFoxysoccermom
Game Day 04 CLASSIC LEAGUE 2018-19Today at 10:17 amNTX-FootyFan
What is the big deal with LHGCLToday at 08:49 amAnonymousCoward
Looking for a scrimmage this weekendToday at 12:24 amnesbit86
03B Classic LeagueYesterday at 11:25 pmMuc03b
Pre-DA DiscussionYesterday at 05:50 pmRooster08dad
Still Looking! Open Practice Tues &Thurs McKinneyYesterday at 11:03 amCtltx
texans uniform number 23 for saleYesterday at 09:52 amsoccer2002
Renegades 2010G North - Blanton Yesterday at 08:13 amtareyncarol
Mckinney United 07G McKinney-Frisco-Prosper 19/08/19, 09:35 pmmikecorich
McKinney United 07G McKinney-Frisco-Prosper 19/08/19, 09:34 pmmikecorich
FC Dallas 05B (coach Chris Che) looking for 05 players19/08/19, 05:13 pmFCDdad0507
Manchester SC 07G Open Sessions19/08/19, 03:47 pmmansc07g
Goal keeper needed 19/08/19, 03:45 pmMaradona
Looking for Adult Medium Kit19/08/19, 10:52 amBalon
DKSC - 1 Spot for Guest Players18/08/19, 08:49 pmhailiesdad
D'Feeters #36 Girls YM - New - Just $5018/08/19, 08:30 pmMrsBean
08 Girls Teams - U90C LABOR DAY OPEN (Aug 30th-Sept 2nd)18/08/19, 07:02 pmU90C
12 Girls Teams - U90C LABOR DAY OPEN (Aug 30th-Sept 2nd)18/08/19, 07:01 pmU90C
10 Girls Teams - U90C LABOR DAY OPEN (Aug 30th-Sept 2nd)18/08/19, 07:00 pmU90C
Log in

I forgot my password

Be An Athletic Supporter!
Donate and get this nifty tag!

Early and Late Bloomers Pixel
Statistics
We have 13585 registered users
The newest registered user is Kedrick

Our users have posted a total of 193695 messages in 27161 subjects

Early and Late Bloomers

Page 1 of 2 1, 2  Next

Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Guest on 03/11/11, 03:19 pm


Some children are early bloomers who enjoy success in sports because they develop faster, not because they have more raw athletic talent. Some children - even if they appear to only be average athletes or lag behind his peers - may be late bloomers whose athletic talent will only become apparent later when they are teenagers; they may ultimately be more gifted athletes.

The unfortunate fact is that, in a society and youth sports culture that places such a heavy emphasis on winning, an early bloomer enjoys advantages that may continue long after peers have caught up and, in many cases, passed him in terms of skill proficiency. As a result, a late bloomer will be put at a significant disadvantage in getting the attention of coaches and the playing time he needs to develop his skills, and may get so frustrated that quitting the sport becomes the only viable option.

Destined for stardom?
It was a glorious autumn Saturday morning in New England: bright sunshine, temperature in the mid-50’s, breezy, the fall foliage at its brilliant peak. Like millions of mothers across America, I was standing with a group of parents at a local elementary school, coffee mugs in hand, watching our sons and daughters play a co-ed, short-sided (7 on 7) recreational soccer game.

While I kept my eye on my three sons whenever they were in the game, I couldn’t help but notice one of their teammates, a boy named Jake, who was around their age. It was the first time I had seen him play. It was obvious by the way he ran up and down the field, the skill with which he dribbled the ball, and the strength and accuracy of his shots on goal that, at least at age nine, his soccer skills were more advanced than those of my sons and the other players.

After Jake scored what must have been his fourth or fifth goal of the day, I turned to my husband and said, “I have no way of knowing, of course, but I am willing to bet right now that Jake is going to be captain of the high school varsity.” He said, “Well, a lot can happen between now and then, and it is impossible to predict whether he will still be this good when he is seventeen or eighteen, but if he continues to play like this, I wouldn’t want to bet against you.”

From that point forward, I made a point of following Jake’s athletic career. He continued to shine on the soccer field. His select club team won the state championship three years in a row; he was a four-time first-team conference all-star and Offensive Player of the Year in his junior and senior years, and team MVP during his senior season. As captain of his high school varsity, he was a four-year starter and a first-team All-State selection. After an outstanding high school career, Jake played college soccer, ending his college career with a total of four goals and one assist after appearing in a total of forty-five games, all as a sub, for a major university on the West Coast, where he earned conference honorable mention All-Academic honors.

Guessing game
How could I predict that Jake would become a successful high school athlete and play at the collegiate level? I coultn't, of course. I didn't have a crystal ball, or some kind of special ability to spot talent. It was just a lucky guess. As it turned out, the success Jake had as a nine-year old was because he actually was blessed with natural athletic talent. But research suggests that only one in four children who are star athletes in elementary school will still be stars when they reach high school. Predicting whether a preteen athlete will be a good enough high school athlete to land a college scholarship or even influence the admissions process is thus almost impossible.

As a 2004 article in the Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance observes, because athletic success involves multiple factors, including genetics, mental attitude, access to training, and money, any attempt to predict future achievement based on how skilled your daughter is at age nine, ten or eleven "is likely to be futile." Each child follows her own unique developmental timetable. While chronological age provides a rough index of developmental level, differences among children of the same age can be and often are great. In other words, as one expert observes, while "development is age related, it is not age dependent."

Advantages for Early Bloomers
Here are some of the advantages an early bloomer tends to receive:

•more positive reinforcement and encouragement from adults;
•earlier and more extensive socialization into sports;
•access to better coaching, facilities, and competitive experiences (i.e., places on "select teams") and
•the benefit of a "residual bias" from being viewed as a talented athlete at an early age.
As a 2004 article in the Journal of Sports Behavior observes, "Early selection for elite sport participants [thus] can become a self-fulfilling prophecy for athletes and coaches. Players begin to think of themselves as talented and are thus likely to invest more time and effort into their sport with predictable results. As the identity of previously selected players becomes known to coaches and administrators, they watch those players more closely lest they miss an elite performer."

Downsides to being early bloomer
Although numerous advantages are conferred on an early bloomer, if your child experiences early success in sports, such success also has some downsides.

An early bloomer:

•is often able to exploit his or her physical ability without having to work as hard at developing skills as less precocious players in order to stay competitive. When the others catch up physically, they may end up being better players because they have been forced to develop their skills while they grew into their bodies.
•often has to try to live up to heightened expectations; this may lead him to practice and play more (e.g. multiple teams durning the same season, for instance) than his young body can handle in order to live up to his reputation. Playing under this kind of pressure often leads to burnout and all that extra wear and tear on his body can lead to overuse injuries.
•may define himself by whether he wins or loses; if he or she is unable to maintain the success he had early in his athletic career, if that self-image is shattered, the results can be disastrous and may lead her to quit sports altogether.
•may tempt her parents to push her to specialize too early and/or train too hard. Excessive training too often leads to burnout and/or overuse injuries, some of which don't show up until high school or college, but can be traced to excessive training when the player was nine, ten or eleven. Parents need to avoid being lulled into valuing short-term success more than their child's long-term future. If they don't, they may be placing their child's physical safety and emotional health at risk.
Parenting Late Bloomers: Emphasize Skill Development
If your child is an average athlete or lags behind his peers, he may be a late bloomer. Late bloomers receive markedly less social support and reinforcement from parents, coaches, and peers. Worse, the adults charged with the responsibility of evaluating "talent" - most of whom don't understand developmental variability in children - may unfairly nip her athletic career in the bud by concluding that he or she lacks the potential to play sports at the highest competitive levels. Denied a place on a select, middle school, or high school sub varsity team, the late bloomer is more likely to drop out of sports rather than keep playing until he blossoms (that is, achieves his full athletic potential).

Here are six important lessons for parents of potential late bloomers:

1.Take a balanced approach. Do not to get too down if your child is not immediately a superstar or too high if he is. The important thing is that he continues to play, to develop and learn new skills.
2.Emphasize the process and the journey, not the results achieved; therefore,
3.Avoid praising the outcome and instead praise effort;
4.Help your child see herself as a whole person, not just as an athlete;
5.Be realistic about possible reasons for early athletic success. Make sure your child understands that early success is not a guarantee of future success (and vice versa).
6.Select a sports program that understands child development. Pick a program that recognizes that variability in the way children's athletic talent develops by offering all children a chance to play as long as they want to.


http://www.nationalsoccerwire.com/news/458/15010

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Guest on 03/11/11, 03:58 pm

#2420 wrote:
Some children are early bloomers who enjoy success in sports because they develop faster, not because they have more raw athletic talent. Some children - even if they appear to only be average athletes or lag behind his peers - may be late bloomers whose athletic talent will only become apparent later when they are teenagers; they may ultimately be more gifted athletes.

The unfortunate fact is that, in a society and youth sports culture that places such a heavy emphasis on winning, an early bloomer enjoys advantages that may continue long after peers have caught up and, in many cases, passed him in terms of skill proficiency. As a result, a late bloomer will be put at a significant disadvantage in getting the attention of coaches and the playing time he needs to develop his skills, and may get so frustrated that quitting the sport becomes the only viable option.

Destined for stardom?
It was a glorious autumn Saturday morning in New England: bright sunshine, temperature in the mid-50’s, breezy, the fall foliage at its brilliant peak. Like millions of mothers across America, I was standing with a group of parents at a local elementary school, coffee mugs in hand, watching our sons and daughters play a co-ed, short-sided (7 on 7) recreational soccer game.

While I kept my eye on my three sons whenever they were in the game, I couldn’t help but notice one of their teammates, a boy named Jake, who was around their age. It was the first time I had seen him play. It was obvious by the way he ran up and down the field, the skill with which he dribbled the ball, and the strength and accuracy of his shots on goal that, at least at age nine, his soccer skills were more advanced than those of my sons and the other players.

After Jake scored what must have been his fourth or fifth goal of the day, I turned to my husband and said, “I have no way of knowing, of course, but I am willing to bet right now that Jake is going to be captain of the high school varsity.” He said, “Well, a lot can happen between now and then, and it is impossible to predict whether he will still be this good when he is seventeen or eighteen, but if he continues to play like this, I wouldn’t want to bet against you.”

From that point forward, I made a point of following Jake’s athletic career. He continued to shine on the soccer field. His select club team won the state championship three years in a row; he was a four-time first-team conference all-star and Offensive Player of the Year in his junior and senior years, and team MVP during his senior season. As captain of his high school varsity, he was a four-year starter and a first-team All-State selection. After an outstanding high school career, Jake played college soccer, ending his college career with a total of four goals and one assist after appearing in a total of forty-five games, all as a sub, for a major university on the West Coast, where he earned conference honorable mention All-Academic honors.

Guessing game
How could I predict that Jake would become a successful high school athlete and play at the collegiate level? I coultn't, of course. I didn't have a crystal ball, or some kind of special ability to spot talent. It was just a lucky guess. As it turned out, the success Jake had as a nine-year old was because he actually was blessed with natural athletic talent. But research suggests that only one in four children who are star athletes in elementary school will still be stars when they reach high school. Predicting whether a preteen athlete will be a good enough high school athlete to land a college scholarship or even influence the admissions process is thus almost impossible.

As a 2004 article in the Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance observes, because athletic success involves multiple factors, including genetics, mental attitude, access to training, and money, any attempt to predict future achievement based on how skilled your daughter is at age nine, ten or eleven "is likely to be futile." Each child follows her own unique developmental timetable. While chronological age provides a rough index of developmental level, differences among children of the same age can be and often are great. In other words, as one expert observes, while "development is age related, it is not age dependent."

Advantages for Early Bloomers
Here are some of the advantages an early bloomer tends to receive:

•more positive reinforcement and encouragement from adults;
•earlier and more extensive socialization into sports;
•access to better coaching, facilities, and competitive experiences (i.e., places on "select teams") and
•the benefit of a "residual bias" from being viewed as a talented athlete at an early age.
As a 2004 article in the Journal of Sports Behavior observes, "Early selection for elite sport participants [thus] can become a self-fulfilling prophecy for athletes and coaches. Players begin to think of themselves as talented and are thus likely to invest more time and effort into their sport with predictable results. As the identity of previously selected players becomes known to coaches and administrators, they watch those players more closely lest they miss an elite performer."

Downsides to being early bloomer
Although numerous advantages are conferred on an early bloomer, if your child experiences early success in sports, such success also has some downsides.

An early bloomer:

•is often able to exploit his or her physical ability without having to work as hard at developing skills as less precocious players in order to stay competitive. When the others catch up physically, they may end up being better players because they have been forced to develop their skills while they grew into their bodies.
•often has to try to live up to heightened expectations; this may lead him to practice and play more (e.g. multiple teams durning the same season, for instance) than his young body can handle in order to live up to his reputation. Playing under this kind of pressure often leads to burnout and all that extra wear and tear on his body can lead to overuse injuries.
•may define himself by whether he wins or loses; if he or she is unable to maintain the success he had early in his athletic career, if that self-image is shattered, the results can be disastrous and may lead her to quit sports altogether.
•may tempt her parents to push her to specialize too early and/or train too hard. Excessive training too often leads to burnout and/or overuse injuries, some of which don't show up until high school or college, but can be traced to excessive training when the player was nine, ten or eleven. Parents need to avoid being lulled into valuing short-term success more than their child's long-term future. If they don't, they may be placing their child's physical safety and emotional health at risk.
Parenting Late Bloomers: Emphasize Skill Development
If your child is an average athlete or lags behind his peers, he may be a late bloomer. Late bloomers receive markedly less social support and reinforcement from parents, coaches, and peers. Worse, the adults charged with the responsibility of evaluating "talent" - most of whom don't understand developmental variability in children - may unfairly nip her athletic career in the bud by concluding that he or she lacks the potential to play sports at the highest competitive levels. Denied a place on a select, middle school, or high school sub varsity team, the late bloomer is more likely to drop out of sports rather than keep playing until he blossoms (that is, achieves his full athletic potential). Here are six important lessons for parents of potential late bloomers:

1.Take a balanced approach. Do not to get too down if your child is not immediately a superstar or too high if he is. The important thing is that he continues to play, to develop and learn new skills.
2.Emphasize the process and the journey, not the results achieved; therefore,
3.Avoid praising the outcome and instead praise effort;
4.Help your child see herself as a whole person, not just as an athlete;
5.Be realistic about possible reasons for early athletic success. Make sure your child understands that early success is not a guarantee of future success (and vice versa).
6.Select a sports program that understands child development. Pick a program that recognizes that variability in the way children's athletic talent develops by offering all children a chance to play as long as they want to.


http://www.nationalsoccerwire.com/news/458/15010


Very good point in my opinion in bold red.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Triumph FC on 03/11/11, 04:31 pm

Here is the biggest problem. Some coaches do recognize late bloomers and like to take time and invest in making the player reach their full potential. The problem is the parent says, "why is my child not playing as much as others, I pay the same money". "How is my child ever going to improve if she doesn't get much playing time?" PRACTICE. The parents of the children who are the early bloomers say why is that player on the team because she clearly isn't as good as my daughter. She better not take playing time away for my daughter who is the star of this team. So its a huge balancing act for the coach and it causes lots of problem because most, when paying, aren't patience, so what happens is, the coach says blow this for a game of soldiers I'm not taking her because of all the hassle! So where does the blame lie? Parents? Coaches? Players? Do the players ever complain about playing time or is it the parents ego's? Question
Triumph FC
Triumph FC
TxSoccer Sponsor
TxSoccer Sponsor

Posts : 1616
Points : 5352
Join date : 2010-06-20

http://www.triumphfc.org

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by txtransplant on 04/11/11, 12:20 pm

I always tell my kids "The pine is a motivator." Basically, if they want more playing time, they need to work harder. At the end of the spring season in academy, my DD spent more than half the game on the bench (a fact many parents new to our squad find unbelieveable). She busted her butt during the summer, worked on her skills in the backyard almost daily, went to additional training sessions, etc. Now she starts and rarely sits. Her coach has commented that it's like a completely different kid out there. And she is. She did it all on her own. I didn't complain to the coach about her playing time. I didn't go running her all around town to find someone who appreciated my kid more. I told her it was up to her.

The most striking difference in the past six months is her self confidence. She knows she has earned her place, her playing time, the respect of her teammates, all of it on her own, without any interference from her parents.
txtransplant
txtransplant
TxSoccer Postmaster
TxSoccer Postmaster

Posts : 288
Points : 3402
Join date : 2011-03-21

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Airwynn on 04/11/11, 01:08 pm

I have to agree. My little one has struggled with self confidence and her place on the team. We have provided her with opportunities to increase her skills and conditioning. She has taken that on like a badge of honor. She is earning her time on the field and she knows it.
I think it is a really difficult balance for coaches who have to deal with parents who demand equal playing time regardless of their childs talent, abilities, and motivation to play. I am a firm believer that as parents we can make available opportunities for our children, but ultimately they have to want it and earn it, and when they do that is when their pride, confidence and development as individuals really grows.
Airwynn
Airwynn
TxSoccer Poster
TxSoccer Poster

Posts : 88
Points : 3247
Join date : 2011-01-31

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by USA203 on 04/11/11, 01:17 pm

THANK YOU all for this terrific thread. I'm a newbie parent to club/competitive soccer and I'd almost quit checking this site/forum at all because of all the silly trash talk of no value to me. Seriously, I think I might just print this one out to help me keep my head on straight about parenting throughout all this competitive soccer stuff!

USA203
TxSoccer Postmaster
TxSoccer Postmaster

Posts : 116
Points : 3033
Join date : 2011-09-14

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by coachr on 04/11/11, 05:45 pm

USA203 wrote:THANK YOU all for this terrific thread. I'm a newbie parent to club/competitive soccer and I'd almost quit checking this site/forum at all because of all the silly trash talk of no value to me. Seriously, I think I might just print this one out to help me keep my head on straight about parenting throughout all this competitive soccer stuff!
Thanks for giving us a second chance.Early and Late Bloomers Nerds1
coachr
coachr
TxSoccer Author
TxSoccer Author

Posts : 989
Points : 4119
Join date : 2011-04-01

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by USA203 on 04/11/11, 06:42 pm

coachr, which one is you? LOL

USA203
TxSoccer Postmaster
TxSoccer Postmaster

Posts : 116
Points : 3033
Join date : 2011-09-14

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Triumph FC on 04/11/11, 08:36 pm

txtransplant wrote:I always tell my kids "The pine is a motivator." Basically, if they want more playing time, they need to work harder. At the end of the spring season in academy, my DD spent more than half the game on the bench (a fact many parents new to our squad find unbelieveable). She busted her butt during the summer, worked on her skills in the backyard almost daily, went to additional training sessions, etc. Now she starts and rarely sits. Her coach has commented that it's like a completely different kid out there. And she is. She did it all on her own. I didn't complain to the coach about her playing time. I didn't go running her all around town to find someone who appreciated my kid more. I told her it was up to her.

The most striking difference in the past six months is her self confidence. She knows she has earned her place, her playing time, the respect of her teammates, all of it on her own, without any interference from her parents.

I want to coach your daughter!! Parents like you make it easier for coaches. I had a parent do exactly the same when his daughter came to him complaining she wasnt getting much playing time (reason being she missed fitness camp and most of the summer workouts due to her being on vacation in her home country). He told her if coach gives you 5 minutes make it the best 5 minutes you can give. She worked her way back in now she starts and plays most games the entire time. Most coaches are not tyrants (yes some are)and want to play everybody, so just earn it. Great post and comments
Triumph FC
Triumph FC
TxSoccer Sponsor
TxSoccer Sponsor

Posts : 1616
Points : 5352
Join date : 2010-06-20

http://www.triumphfc.org

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Lp9904 on 04/11/11, 11:38 pm

What about the coach that says everyone must earn their time on the field by showing up to practice, practicing hard, and being a good example, then he plays everyone equally because he is too afraid of the parents that will get upset when their DD, that missed practice and goofs off in practice, doesn't get equal playing time? It sends the wrong message to the players that are busting their rumps day in and day out.
Lp9904
Lp9904
TxSoccer Poster
TxSoccer Poster

Posts : 67
Points : 3097
Join date : 2011-05-24
Age : 53

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Type 1 left-footer on 05/11/11, 07:28 am

Lp9904 wrote:What about the coach that says everyone must earn their time on the field by showing up to practice, practicing hard, and being a good example, then he plays everyone equally because he is too afraid of the parents that will get upset when their DD, that missed practice and goofs off in practice, doesn't get equal playing time? It sends the wrong message to the players that are busting their rumps day in and day out.

welcome to how it "really works" Mad
Type 1 left-footer
Type 1 left-footer
TxSoccer Addict
TxSoccer Addict

Posts : 1026
Points : 5043
Join date : 2009-12-02

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Lefty on 05/11/11, 07:51 am

Lp9904 wrote:What about the coach that says everyone must earn their time on the field by showing up to practice, practicing hard, and being a good example, then he plays everyone equally because he is too afraid of the parents that will get upset when their DD, that missed practice and goofs off in practice, doesn't get equal playing time? It sends the wrong message to the players that are busting their rumps day in and day out.

Or the flip side of that situation which is also fairly common. The coach makes the same claims, but has some players who miss practice, goof off or are uncoachable but play the most on game day as the coach feels they give him/her the best chance to win.

Lefty
TxSoccer Addict
TxSoccer Addict

Posts : 1109
Points : 4885
Join date : 2009-05-18

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Guest on 05/11/11, 09:47 am

Old saying, about youth players "Good Today does not mean Good Tomorrow".

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by txtransplant on 05/11/11, 04:06 pm

#2420 wrote:Old saying, about youth players "Good Today does not mean Good Tomorrow".

Exactly. My youngest DD's coach is very smart about when he subs in the "late bloomers" or weaker players because he believes every child, even if they are a superstar, will perform better if given the opportunity to rest a few minutes. The weaker subs aren't placed on the field at the same time. Players are shifted to account for strengths and weaknesses. And if one of the weaker players happens to be playing better than one of the "superstars" that particular week, they're going to see more time and the star will be riding the pine.

txtransplant
txtransplant
TxSoccer Postmaster
TxSoccer Postmaster

Posts : 288
Points : 3402
Join date : 2011-03-21

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by DrSoccer on 05/11/11, 07:52 pm

are there any playing time rules for academy?
DrSoccer
DrSoccer
TxSoccer Author
TxSoccer Author

Posts : 532
Points : 4320
Join date : 2009-05-26

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Guest on 09/11/11, 12:38 pm

DrSoccer wrote:are there any playing time rules for academy?
I don't think so.
Which is a problem in my eyes! In defense of academy. You can play rec. Which the two are the same just different rules and parent ego's!

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Guest on 09/11/11, 12:41 pm

#2420 wrote:
DrSoccer wrote:are there any playing time rules for academy?
I don't think so.
Which is a problem in my eyes! In defense of academy. You can play rec. Which the two are the same just different rules and parent ego's!
I also forgot the price difference.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by USA203 on 09/11/11, 12:51 pm

[/quote] I also forgot the price difference.[/quote]

That was funny!

USA203
TxSoccer Postmaster
TxSoccer Postmaster

Posts : 116
Points : 3033
Join date : 2011-09-14

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by bigtex75081 on 09/11/11, 01:12 pm

The initial post is really well written and an excellent topic. A very enjoyable read, thank you for it.
bigtex75081
bigtex75081
TxSoccer Author
TxSoccer Author

Posts : 582
Points : 3435
Join date : 2011-11-08
Age : 42
Location : I'm right behind you.

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by USA203 on 09/11/11, 01:52 pm

To add to the "late bloomer" idea--the technical term when referring to growth (height) issues is "constitutional growth delay". I have a child (not my soccer player) who is delayed. The endocrinologist did a bone scan and all kinds of tests and can tell based on the results that he will catch up in height but probably not until highschool. He said kids his age who are tall now will probably stop around middle school or early highschool and that's about when he will start a major growth spurt. This made me wonder about the soccer kids who, when younger, are less attractive to some competitive teams/coaches than other taller/bigger players (all other skills,etc being equal). I've often wondered if it might actually be an advantage as the "shorter kid" has to work extra hard on skills and can't rely on size....add the size factor when they get older and watch out!

USA203
TxSoccer Postmaster
TxSoccer Postmaster

Posts : 116
Points : 3033
Join date : 2011-09-14

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Guest on 09/11/11, 04:26 pm

USA203 wrote:To add to the "late bloomer" idea--the technical term when referring to growth (height) issues is "constitutional growth delay". I have a child (not my soccer player) who is delayed. The endocrinologist did a bone scan and all kinds of tests and can tell based on the results that he will catch up in height but probably not until highschool. He said kids his age who are tall now will probably stop around middle school or early highschool and that's about when he will start a major growth spurt. This made me wonder about the soccer kids who, when younger, are less attractive to some competitive teams/coaches than other taller/bigger players (all other skills,etc being equal). I've often wondered if it might actually be an advantage as the "shorter kid" has to work extra hard on skills and can't rely on size....add the size factor when they get older and watch out!
Problem is that the late bloomer are weeded out to early to find out if they are going to be good soccer players as the mature. Usually by 10 or 12 yrs old they have been told this is not for them in some sort of way. It's really kind of dumb for the clubs to let this go on. The clubs should understand it only causes them to lose long term money. It seems that the clubs would want to keep them all in the system for the general growth of youth soccer.


Last edited by #2420 on 09/11/11, 09:07 pm; edited 2 times in total

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Guest on 09/11/11, 06:32 pm

Triumph FC wrote:Here is the biggest problem. Some coaches do recognize late bloomers and like to take time and invest in making the player reach their full potential. The problem is the parent says, "why is my child not playing as much as others, I pay the same money". "How is my child ever going to improve if she doesn't get much playing time?" PRACTICE. The parents of the children who are the early bloomers say why is that player on the team because she clearly isn't as good as my daughter. She better not take playing time away for my daughter who is the star of this team. So its a huge balancing act for the coach and it causes lots of problem because most, when paying, aren't patience, so what happens is, the coach says blow this for a game of soldiers I'm not taking her because of all the hassle! So where does the blame lie? Parents? Coaches? Players? Do the players ever complain about playing time or is it the parents ego's? Question

At which point do you start rewarding that late bloomer? When she grows up? Or outplays the other players on your team?

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Guest on 09/11/11, 07:06 pm

If you put this under a microscope, it seems like if you put two players side by side and say their skill level is equal but you're bigger and/or faster, or hey, you are an early bloomer... you're the winner! Or, let's say that smaller player has a whole lot more skills and produces quite a bit of goals... does that late bloomer or "whatever" still get more rights to playing time? Why don't you just stick a ring of fire out there and make that late bloomer jump through them with blind folds on. Really, you have the audacity to come on here and say practice more? Do you really know how much your players practice outside of practice? Because it shows on the soccer field during the game when some of these players that don't come off the field and their skill level is lacking. We can see it. We are not blind and it's not pretty to watch.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by dadofdd9799 on 09/11/11, 10:26 pm

I read this forum occassionally but rarely post on here. However, this thread caught my eye and I thought I would share our experience. We had a late bloomer. When she was 8,9,10 and probably even 11, she loved the game of soccer, would come off the field smiling, so happy. My wife and I would look at each other and scratch our heads-what could she love?? She stunk! My wife insisted I continue to let her play since she seemed to love it. Around 10, she said she wanted to go to a camp and try out for select at 11. We let her go to camp but discouraged club, along with a few coaches (who were clearly not interested). So we found her a skills coach and continued rec. She started to gain confidence on the field. She also started to develop quite a bit of speed as she grew. U12-begged to play select- We looked at two D3 club teams, offers from both-thought that would be a good place to start. Now at U15, the girls that were running circles around her at 10, she has far surpassed. Playing on a top tier team and if she keeps it up, has big dreams to play college ball. Believe me-I would have encouraged her to quit at 9-except I had a much smarter wife!
You really do just never know. So if your daughter enjoys the game, encourage her to keep playing and give it her all.

dadofdd9799
TxSoccer Poster
TxSoccer Poster

Posts : 12
Points : 3346
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Texdad on 09/11/11, 10:47 pm

dadofdd9799 wrote:I read this forum occassionally but rarely post on here. However, this thread caught my eye and I thought I would share our experience. We had a late bloomer. When she was 8,9,10 and probably even 11, she loved the game of soccer, would come off the field smiling, so happy. My wife and I would look at each other and scratch our heads-what could she love?? She stunk! My wife insisted I continue to let her play since she seemed to love it. Around 10, she said she wanted to go to a camp and try out for select at 11. We let her go to camp but discouraged club, along with a few coaches (who were clearly not interested). So we found her a skills coach and continued rec. She started to gain confidence on the field. She also started to develop quite a bit of speed as she grew. U12-begged to play select- We looked at two D3 club teams, offers from both-thought that would be a good place to start. Now at U15, the girls that were running circles around her at 10, she has far surpassed. Playing on a top tier team and if she keeps it up, has big dreams to play college ball. Believe me-I would have encouraged her to quit at 9-except I had a much smarter wife!
You really do just never know. So if your daughter enjoys the game, encourage her to keep playing and give it her all.

Sounds like you have a smart wife sir. I love hearing stories like this.
But, what if she had gotten those skill sessions at age 7 instead of 11?

If you want to find out which players will be great when they get older, find the ones that have a real love and passion for the game. They are the ones that will put in the extra time and dedication to become great players. Some of those passionate players are already studs, some of them are average, and some are just learning the game. but they will all rise to the top over time.

Texdad
TxSoccer Poster
TxSoccer Poster

Posts : 47
Points : 2955
Join date : 2011-09-06

Back to top Go down

Early and Late Bloomers Empty Re: Early and Late Bloomers

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 1 of 2 1, 2  Next

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum