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Post by isthis4real 07/12/14, 12:25 am

I know I don't have to ask for honesty because everyone here seems to always speak their minds. My DD is not comfortable or happy with the way her current coach handles her so she no longer wants to play with the team. He yells at her on the field which causes her to shut down ( she is sensitive and he has made her afraid to make mistakes) and has taken the fun out of the game for her. I understand at this point in the year things are becoming more serious with select a season away so I understand the intensity.

She has been in academy almost three years so she has consistently played against most of the coaches on our list since moving over from rec.
This may sound stupid but aside from a few blow ups over the years I usually don't pay attention to the other teams coach.

If yall could voice any past experience with any of the coaches, good or bad on this list I would greatly appreciate the input!!!

I do understand that we need to visit with each team just looking for a little info first.

Thanks!


Grey

Garrett

Hanlon

Erwin

Rundell

Haylock

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Post by lawless 08/12/14, 11:19 am

Well I will offer my limited experience with these coaches. My dd guest played with Rundell and enjoyed the herself. We attended two practices and I liked what I saw. They were able to move the ball nicely together but also have a very fast forward that will go get it if it's put out in front of her. With different teams my dd has also played against Grey's team quite often and they always have a comptitive squad. Best of luck and maybe others will have some insight.

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Post by isthis4real 08/12/14, 12:05 pm

Thank you, I appreciate your input!



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Post by Guest 08/12/14, 12:54 pm

It sounds like you already know what coaching style she needs. Now you just need to find a coach that doesn't yell. The list should be small.

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Post by isthis4real 08/12/14, 02:11 pm

The trouble here is finding the coach that will act the same once you are on team as they did while they were trying to get your DD to join.

I understand most if not all coaches yell at some point, that's just part of the game.

My point to this post is to find a coach that will learn how to best deal with each individual to get their point across which will produce a positive result as well as positively affect the individual player.

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Post by jogobonito06 08/12/14, 04:28 pm

All coaches yell to some degree. It can be hard to be heard across the pitch. It's what they yell that makes a huge difference. On any given Sunday in the NTX jungle you might find:

1. The puppeteers - these are the ones that yell all game, every game. They must orchestrate every touch on the ball. The problem is they produce robots not soccer players.

2. The egomaniacs - a subset of the puppeteers, not only do they want to orchestrate every touch, but they will let you know in no uncertain terms if you are "not playing soccer the right way". Of course the only right way is their way.

3. The control freaks - these will respond to a poor touch or decision with a threat. They have to let the whole complex know they are in charge. e.g. "If you do that again, I'm pulling you out." Great motivators this bunch.

4. The reverse motivators - these will typically single out 1 or 2 kids to berate throughout a game. "Suzie!! You're just standing and watching!! AGAIN!!". They hope to motivate the rest of team who are thinking "Gosh, I'm glad its not me being screamed at."

5. The woefully unprepared - these will scream at the top of their lungs when kids don't immediately know what to do on set pieces because they didn't work on anything in training.

6. The narcissists - somewhere deep inside, these actually think the game is about them. When they're not winking at the team moms or shaving their legs, they know some well-timed yelling will bring everybody's attention back to where it belongs. On them.

7. The peter pans - since they make their living in short pants, these also feel its alright to throw tantrums, kick things on the sideline and refuse to shake hands or participate in trophy ceremonies after a match. Many of this species have an emotional age lower than that of their players.

8. The hypocritical sandbaggers - by far the most populous species in NTX, these will do anything to win a little girl's soccer match. They'll bring in players from higher-ranked teams and sit their own players. They'll lie on the tournament entry about what team they actually are. They'll park the bus in U7 and U8 matches. But then they will be the first ones on this blog and their websites touting concepts like "development" which they neither care about nor understand.

And then, if you are extremely lucky you might stumble onto the rarest of all the birds in the jungle, the soccer coach. These only raise their voice if necessary to be heard by a particular player. They don't threaten, but encourage. A comment on a mistake is slanted toward making the player think about how to correct it. Their instruction is geared toward the future, not the past. The point is to help your players prepare for what's next, not dwell on what has already happened. They don't try to orchestrate every touch because they understand that the game really is the best teacher. And for great periods, they might actually sit down and be quiet (gasp!), because most of their work has already been done. In training.

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Post by otip 08/12/14, 06:53 pm

????


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Post by Guest 08/12/14, 10:09 pm

Good read.
jogobonito07 wrote:All coaches yell to some degree.  It can be hard to be heard across the pitch.  It's what they yell that makes a huge difference.  On any given Sunday in the NTX jungle you might find:  

1.  The puppeteers - these are the ones that yell all game, every game.  They must orchestrate every touch on the ball. The problem is they produce robots not soccer players.
 
2.  The egomaniacs - a subset of the puppeteers, not only do they want to orchestrate every touch, but they will let you know in no uncertain terms if you are "not playing soccer the right way".  Of course the only right way is their way.

3.  The control freaks - these will respond to a poor touch or decision with a threat.  They have to let the whole complex know they are in charge.  e.g. "If you do that again, I'm pulling you out."  Great motivators this bunch.

4.  The reverse motivators - these will typically single out 1 or 2 kids to berate throughout a game.  "Suzie!! You're just standing and watching!! AGAIN!!".  They hope to motivate the rest of team who are thinking "Gosh, I'm glad its not me being screamed at."

5.  The woefully unprepared - these will scream at the top of their lungs when kids don't immediately know what to do on set pieces because they didn't work on anything in training.

6.  The narcissists - somewhere deep inside, these actually think the game is about them.  When they're not winking at the team moms or shaving their legs, they know some well-timed yelling will bring everybody's attention back to where it belongs. On them.

7.  The peter pans - since they make their living in short pants, these also feel its alright to throw tantrums, kick things on the sideline and refuse to shake hands or participate in trophy ceremonies after a match.  Many of this species have an emotional age lower than that of their players.  

8.  The hypocritical sandbaggers -  by far the most populous species in NTX, these will do anything to win a little girl's soccer match.  They'll bring in players from higher-ranked teams and sit their own players.  They'll lie on the tournament entry about what team they actually are. They'll park the bus in U7 and U8 matches. But then they will be the first ones on this blog and their websites touting concepts like "development" which they neither care about nor understand.  

And then, if you are extremely lucky you might stumble onto the rarest of all the birds in the jungle, the soccer coach.  These only raise their voice if necessary to be heard by a particular player.  They don't threaten, but encourage.  A comment on a mistake is slanted toward making the player think about how to correct it.  Their instruction is geared toward the future, not the past.  The point is to help your players prepare for what's next, not dwell on what has already happened.  They don't try to orchestrate every touch because they understand that the game really is the best teacher.  And for great periods, they might actually sit down and be quiet (gasp!), because most of their work has already been done.  In training.


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Post by Tatanka 10/12/14, 06:17 am

jogobonito07 wrote:All coaches yell to some degree.  It can be hard to be heard across the pitch.  It's what they yell that makes a huge difference.  On any given Sunday in the NTX jungle you might find:  

1.  The puppeteers - these are the ones that yell all game, every game.  They must orchestrate every touch on the ball. The problem is they produce robots not soccer players.
 
2.  The egomaniacs - a subset of the puppeteers, not only do they want to orchestrate every touch, but they will let you know in no uncertain terms if you are "not playing soccer the right way".  Of course the only right way is their way.

3.  The control freaks - these will respond to a poor touch or decision with a threat.  They have to let the whole complex know they are in charge.  e.g. "If you do that again, I'm pulling you out."  Great motivators this bunch.

4.  The reverse motivators - these will typically single out 1 or 2 kids to berate throughout a game.  "Suzie!! You're just standing and watching!! AGAIN!!".  They hope to motivate the rest of team who are thinking "Gosh, I'm glad its not me being screamed at."

5.  The woefully unprepared - these will scream at the top of their lungs when kids don't immediately know what to do on set pieces because they didn't work on anything in training.

6.  The narcissists - somewhere deep inside, these actually think the game is about them.  When they're not winking at the team moms or shaving their legs, they know some well-timed yelling will bring everybody's attention back to where it belongs. On them.

7.  The peter pans - since they make their living in short pants, these also feel its alright to throw tantrums, kick things on the sideline and refuse to shake hands or participate in trophy ceremonies after a match.  Many of this species have an emotional age lower than that of their players.  

8.  The hypocritical sandbaggers -  by far the most populous species in NTX, these will do anything to win a little girl's soccer match.  They'll bring in players from higher-ranked teams and sit their own players.  They'll lie on the tournament entry about what team they actually are. They'll park the bus in U7 and U8 matches. But then they will be the first ones on this blog and their websites touting concepts like "development" which they neither care about nor understand.  

And then, if you are extremely lucky you might stumble onto the rarest of all the birds in the jungle, the soccer coach.  These only raise their voice if necessary to be heard by a particular player.  They don't threaten, but encourage.  A comment on a mistake is slanted toward making the player think about how to correct it.  Their instruction is geared toward the future, not the past.  The point is to help your players prepare for what's next, not dwell on what has already happened.  They don't try to orchestrate every touch because they understand that the game really is the best teacher.  And for great periods, they might actually sit down and be quiet (gasp!), because most of their work has already been done.  In training.

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Post by Guest 10/12/14, 09:13 am

jogobonito07 wrote:All coaches yell to some degree.  It can be hard to be heard across the pitch.  It's what they yell that makes a huge difference.  On any given Sunday in the NTX jungle you might find:  

1.  The puppeteers - these are the ones that yell all game, every game.  They must orchestrate every touch on the ball. The problem is they produce robots not soccer players.
 
2.  The egomaniacs - a subset of the puppeteers, not only do they want to orchestrate every touch, but they will let you know in no uncertain terms if you are "not playing soccer the right way".  Of course the only right way is their way.

3.  The control freaks - these will respond to a poor touch or decision with a threat.  They have to let the whole complex know they are in charge.  e.g. "If you do that again, I'm pulling you out."  Great motivators this bunch.

4.  The reverse motivators - these will typically single out 1 or 2 kids to berate throughout a game.  "Suzie!! You're just standing and watching!! AGAIN!!".  They hope to motivate the rest of team who are thinking "Gosh, I'm glad its not me being screamed at."

5.  The woefully unprepared - these will scream at the top of their lungs when kids don't immediately know what to do on set pieces because they didn't work on anything in training.

6.  The narcissists - somewhere deep inside, these actually think the game is about them.  When they're not winking at the team moms or shaving their legs, they know some well-timed yelling will bring everybody's attention back to where it belongs. On them.

7.  The peter pans - since they make their living in short pants, these also feel its alright to throw tantrums, kick things on the sideline and refuse to shake hands or participate in trophy ceremonies after a match.  Many of this species have an emotional age lower than that of their players.  

8.  The hypocritical sandbaggers -  by far the most populous species in NTX, these will do anything to win a little girl's soccer match.  They'll bring in players from higher-ranked teams and sit their own players.  They'll lie on the tournament entry about what team they actually are. They'll park the bus in U7 and U8 matches. But then they will be the first ones on this blog and their websites touting concepts like "development" which they neither care about nor understand.  

And then, if you are extremely lucky you might stumble onto the rarest of all the birds in the jungle, the soccer coach.  These only raise their voice if necessary to be heard by a particular player.  They don't threaten, but encourage.  A comment on a mistake is slanted toward making the player think about how to correct it.  Their instruction is geared toward the future, not the past.  The point is to help your players prepare for what's next, not dwell on what has already happened.  They don't try to orchestrate every touch because they understand that the game really is the best teacher.  And for great periods, they might actually sit down and be quiet (gasp!), because most of their work has already been done.  In training.


One of the top 5 posts I've read here and that says a lot. Excellent, well done, a must read... 

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Post by Guest 10/12/14, 09:45 am

Excellent list.

Needs to do one on us parents. Twisted Evil

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Post by MoveYourFeet 10/12/14, 10:59 am

Borussia wrote:Excellent list.

Needs to do one on us parents.  Twisted Evil

This video covers a lot of people. (So annoying but so true)

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Post by Piper 10/12/14, 12:58 pm

My DD played up on Gray's team years ago before moving to a team her age and we really liked him and his coaching style. He's not the yelling type and focuses a lot on skills and development.

I can't comment on the other coaches, but in my opinion you can't go wrong with Coach Stephen.

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